crispyravioli:

eriderp-ampora:

kedreeva:

8bitrevolver:

This was meant to be a quick warm up, but it turned into a comic that I’ve wanted to draw for a while. This is something that is extremely important to me, and I appreciate it if you read it.

A while ago, I heard a story that broke my heart. A family went a cat shelter to adopt. The daughter fell in love with a 3-legged cat. The father straight up said “absolutely not”. Because he was missing a leg. That cat was that close to having a family that loved him, but the missing leg held him back. Why?!

Many people have the initial instinct of “nope” when they see an imperfect animal. I get it, but less-adoptable does NOT mean less loveable. 9 out of 10 people will choose a kitten over an adult cat. And those 10% that would get an adult cat often overlook “different” animals.

All I want people to do is be open to the idea of having a “different” pet in their lives. Choose the pet that you fall in love with, but at least give all of them a fair shot at winning your heart.

Don’t dismiss them, they deserve a loving home just as much as any other cat. They still purr, they still love a warm lap, they still play, they still love you. Trust me, next time you are in the market for a new kitty, just go over to that one cat that’s missing an eye and see what he’s all about!

Let me tell to you a thing.

This is Lenore. I first saw her in a little cage at the Petco I frequent (I used to take my parents’ dog in for puppy play time), and she looked like the grouchiest, old, crotchety cat in the world, and I fell instantly in love. She was cranky, she was anti-social, hanging out at the back of her cage. Her fur was matted because she wouldn’t let the groomers near her.

She was perfect.

But I didn’t have a place for her. I wasn’t living in my own space yet, and where I was, I wasn’t allowed cats. So I pressed my face to the bars of her cage and I promised that if no one had adopted her by the time I’d bought a house, I would come back for her.

I visited her every week for over six months while I looked for a house. At one point, they had to just shave her entire rear-end because the mats or fur were so bad. They told me she clawed the heck outta the groomer that did it, screamed the entire time, and spent the next two days growling at anyone that came near the cage.

A couple of weeks later, I closed on my house. I went back and I got an employee, and I said: “That one. I need that cat.”

They got the paperwork and the lady who ran the rescue that was bringing the cats in told me that Lenore (at the time, Lila) was 8 years old, had been owned by an elderly lady who had died, and brought in to a different rescue, who’d had her for six months on top of the time I’d been seeing her at Petco.

This kitty had been living in a 3x3’ cube for over a YEAR because she was older and “less adoptable.”

I signed the paperwork, put her in a cat carrier, and drove her to my new home. I had pretty much nothing; a bed, an old couch, a couple of bookcases, and a tank of mice I called “Cat TV”. I let her out of the carrier and onto my bed, and I told her “I told you I would come back for you when I had a place. It’s not much, but it’s yours too now.”

Lenore spent the next three days straight purring non-stop. She followed me around the house purring. Sat next to me purring. Slept next to me purring. Leaning into every touch, purring, purring, always purring. She still purrs if you so much as think about petting her. She’s amazing, and I love her.

So, you know, if you’re thinking about adopting, and you see a beast that others consider “less adoptable,” think about Lenore.

I will always reblog this. Adopt an older cat or a ‘broken’ cats, I highly recommend it.

My dude and I have adopted two older cats and it was the best decision ever! They’re the sweetest babies and we would only ever adopt older! 

(via emilyofthepen)

(via surfacewaves)

ofcityromance:

softy pants.

(via aspirationalcatlady)

(via toocooltobehipster)

awwww-cute:

My cat guarding her first and only baby

(via briteyesonly)

rockees:

a ferocious beast

(via leonardmcsass)

smokinonthemoon:

blackwallflower:

airyairyquitecontrary:

PICK ME UP. RIGHT NOW. I WANT TO TALK TO YOU.

Grumpy cloud

THAT IS SO CUTE I JUST DIED

(via capture-the-moon-and-stars)

(via dropbeatsnotbombs97)

sweetguts:

lifeis4chumps:

no why

a marshmallow is squished beneath the weight of knowledge

(via quietandconstellated)

(via foxycunt)

catsncats:

Photo by ©love4my2cats:

Sleeping so sweetly :)

(via catsncuddles)

canisantiquus:

Don’t take your dog out in the afternoon heat during summer!
    Not unless you’re going to the river or beach, or a nice cool shady spot. Humans are very efficient at staying cool, using our whole bodies as radiators. Dogs not so much. Their coats will protect them from sunburn, but not sunstroke!

Ways to avoid heat stress in the summer:

  • Wear a light jacket when you walk your dog- this will allow you to better judge when enough is enough by feeling the heat yourself.
  • Walk before lunch or after dinner, when the sun is not its strongest.
  • Set up a kids pool or sprinkler so your dog can wade and chase the water.
  • Wrap a wet bandanna around your dog’s neck
  • Buy a light heat-reflecting vest for black dogs
  • Shave your dog’s underside so it can passively shed heat.
  • Have your dog’s undercoat removed - this is usually an arduous and tedious task, so you may want to pay a groomer to do it.
  • Freeze plain yogurt or broth for a cooling treat

Be especially wary of heat stroke for short-faced, cobby, and heavy-coated dogs!

Symptoms include: 
rapid abdominal contraction, excessive panting, flushed tongue, thick saliva, high heartrate, unsettledness, high internal temperature.

      If your dog shows signs of heat stroke, cool them down immediately by wetting them, giving water, fanning, making sure the air and water penetrates their coat.

     Even if a dog shows no signs of damage, heat stroke can cause internal/organ damage, so have a checkup with a vet.

(via everythingall-ofthetime)

houtis:

War Kitties in Hammocks

Carriers and other vessels got infested with rodents. So cats were not just moral boosters (which they very much were) they were also working members of the crew. Some have even been immortalized for surviving multiple attacks on their ships, etc. Military dogs have been recognized for the important roles they’ve played but I think cats kinda get lost in the shuffle of military animals sometimes.

(via grimiaulkin)

reallylameblog:

paradisaic:

wethatkindoforc:

So my cat is sleeping between my legs and then this happened and I laughed so hard he woke up.

that’s a potato

Your cat looks like an uncooked chicken

(via ilovecatsok)

Dark Forest Beauty

(via goatsfolyfe)